When you work from home, you work on your body

Work from home is about more than just how much time you spend in the office.

A study in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that, on average, people who worked from home spent more time in the lab or in a study setting than people who did not work from a desk.

Work from Home and Work: How Much Do We Actually Need?

article When you’re working from home you work out of the sun and away from your family, meaning you have fewer opportunities for physical activity and may be less likely to have a healthy lifestyle.

But you’re also more likely to work out at home, and your body may be working harder to meet the demands of working from a computer, a tablet or phone.

The Mayo Clinic’s study found that while a majority of workers reported doing at least some work from the office, only 40 per cent reported doing it more than twice a week.

Work From Home and Health and Safety: What You Need to Know article You should take time to recharge and recover after a long day at work, the Mayo Clinic study said.

This is especially important if you work at home from a smartphone or computer.

But if you have a lot of work on a day, and don’t feel well, it may be more important to take time away from the house.

You should also be mindful of how you spend your time.

“For some, working from their home is a big part of their work day.

But for others, it’s a part of the time they spend at home,” Dr. David Himmelstein, a professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic and author of Work From Your Home, Work, and the Future of Your Work, told the New York Times.